Published On: Thu, Mar 29th, 2018

Chilly air to strike back at times in early April

AccuWeather Global Weather Center — March 28, 2018  — AccuWeather reports  while the northeastern United States is forecast to turn the corner on spring weather this week, there will still be some chilly days ahead during the first part of April.
The north-central-U.S.-based cold air will translate to some crisp days around the Great Lakes and the central and northern Appalachians, but temperatures will moderate a bit as air descends from the Appalachians to the coastal Northeast.
 
Millions of people in the Northeast have endured a rough March, and many are hoping that wintry weather is now a thing of the past.
 
In a March poll, 68 percent of AccuWeather readers voted that they were done with winter storms and ready for spring warmth. However, 26 percent of people weighed in that they loved the snow and wished it would keep on coming.
 
While April should bring a vast improvement for those who loathe snow and cold, the weather this time of the year can be a quick-change artist, according to AccuWeather Chief Meteorologist Elliot Abrams.
 
The upcoming changing weather conditions will require frequent adjustments in outerwear. Some days will allow people to get away to a light jacket or no jacket at all, and there will be other days where a winter coat might be needed for those who mind the chill.
 
Temperatures are likely to climb enough in the days ahead to spur on a surge of tree pollen, beginning along the mid-Atlantic coast and spreading northward into part of New England and westward into the central Appalachians. It may be a few more weeks before tree pollen builds over upstate New York and New England.
 
However, sinus sufferers can expect more days with moisture in the air to ease dry sinus conditions. However, there will still be some days where the air is very dry. A negative of the increased moisture will be the potential for mold spores t be released in abundance.
 
Following a siege of clouds and moist, chilly ocean air at midweek, temperatures will climb to above-average levels on Thursday and Friday in most locations. However, some people may need a jacket and/or an umbrella due to rain.
Along the Interstate 95 corridor, highs on Thursday will range from the 50s F in Boston to near 60 in New York City and near 80 in Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Virginia. Even in the Appalachians, temperatures are forecast to reach between 55 and 75. There will be a press of cooler air into the Northeast on Friday, though temperatures will generally remain above average.
 
During Easter weekend, the first of several waves of chilly air will sweep from the Upper Midwest to the coastal Northeast.
 
“In most cases, the core of each batch of cold air is likely remain anchored over the Upper Midwest,” according to AccuWeather Lead Long-Range Meteorologist Paul Pastelok.
The north-central-U.S.-based cold air will translate to some crisp days around the Great Lakes and the central and northern Appalachians, but temperatures will moderate a bit as air descends from the Appalachians to the coastal Northeast.
 
In terms of storms, the pattern may be rather busy.
 
People should expect some sort of shower or rain event roughly every other day. It is a type of pattern that may make tackling major outdoor projects a challenge but may allow some minor or quick tasks to be accomplished, especially where and when the rain falls at night, instead of during the daylight hours.
 
Because of the frequent nature of the storms, adjustments on the timing and magnitude of each rain event may vary a few days out.
 
In terms of any snow or ice, parts of the region are not done with wintry precipitation just yet.
 
“While accumulating snow is much less likely in the I-95 corridor of the mid-Atlantic, there are likely to be a small number of storms that may produce at least some wet snow in the Appalachians and central and northwestern New England into the first half of April,” Pastelok said.
It is possible that people in some communities over the northern tier and perhaps the cenral Appalachians may have to use the shovel to clear away some slush.
It is possible that people in some communities over the northern tier and perhaps the cenral Appalachians may have to use the shovel to clear away some slush.
 
A storm may come about around April 3-4 that has some snow on its northwestern flank, Pastelok stated.
 
Avoid leaving cold weather-sensitive potted plants outdoors as there are still plenty of freezing nights ahead. Getting grass seed to germinate before it rots could be a challenge.
 
“Around the middle of April, we expect a more pronounced turnaround to more consistent spring temperatures, especially in the Appalachians,” Pastelok said.
 

Source & Image Credits: Renee Duff, Meteorologist  for AccuWeather.com.

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